Sex workers are sending a message to our young girls that selling their bodies for money, ok! Prostitution is part of being feminist! #FOC

LGBTQ+, immigrant rights, harm reduction and criminalIf you ask 100 sex workers why they work in the business, you’ll get 100 different answers. Some enter the industry by force, some are in it for the money, and others genuinely enjoy the work. Moving this large, diverse industry online has fundamentally changed how sex is bought and sold, generating benefits as well as horrible costs.The problem with Sex work as it relates to the economic of today as most economist called it a “matching” problem. Buyers and seller couldn’t find each other before the internet existed, it was extremely difficult for these people to connect. Even Regionally trade for sex was limited and advertising in local paper was a serious risk. That also ushered in illegal sex trade, illicit businesses and violence and force contracts. As time fast forward to the 20th century,There are low-end prostitutes who walk the street and work with pimps on one end, and high-end escorts who work for agencies on the other. But on the internet, sex workers found they could advertise to many more potential customers, and all segments of the market moved online, though they might advertise in different places.

The Internet Open A Can Of Worm

The internet doesn’t just help workers advertise more widely. Sex workers gather on message boards where they share strategies, pricing, and warnings about bad customers. For their part, customers post detailed reviews on sites like The Erotic Review. The combination of these sites brings buyers and sellers together far more efficiently than before. Services are bundled, search costs are lower, and verifiable reputations for everyone involved bring greater transparency to a previously opaque industry.Craigslist and Backpage are the most popular sites that cater to the low-end market, while Eros is the best-known site on to the higher end, though there is often overlap.

Is selling sex online safer?

Another fear is that a purported client might be an undercover cop. When asked, sex workers are divided on what’s a bigger worry, violent psychopaths or the police. What isn’t in doubt is that sex workers now use technology to make themselves safer from both, mostly through better screening.Screening lets a sex worker learn more about a new client’s background and intentions before agreeing to meet with him. Informal examples include asking for letters of reference, calling him at work, doing background checks, and talking extensively via email and the phone. Formal examples include designated third-party services like Preferred411 or shared “whitelists” of approved clients.

THE WHITELIST

Whitelists have always been around in the business of sex work and prostitution industry, but until the internet came along they weren’t as widely shared.It seems sex workers are safer despite engaging in more encounters thanks to the internet.They also found that Craiglist’s service was associated with a higher probability of escorts working independent of an agency and more “incalls,” in which a client travels to meet a sex worker.

How the internet changed the price of sex

These women are making rag to riches overnight and there is no way they’ll stop exchanging sex for money. According to a guardians new interview with Mariah “I will also look at the places that I travel to for work, go to the ads on Backpage.com or Eros.com, and then check out their websites,” she said. “Most girls will have their prices listed.” Prices are cheaper in the Midwest, at about $200 an hour, but on the coasts she charges $260.

egularly checking market conditions allows Elle to increase her prices. Unlike women in most industries, Elle is always aware what others are paid, and this empowers her to set prices that suit market conditions. Of course, unlike other markets, sex services are unique. Prices matter, but providers offer enough of an idiosyncratic service that there is less pressure to undercut the competition at the margin, by offering $299 instead of $300 per hour, for example.

As the market has grown, different price tiers have emerged for different segments. Data from The Erotic Review reveal a multi-tiered market, with prices clustering around even numbers such as $200, $250, and $300 per hour.

Illegal sex work has become safer, easier, and more profitable. Is that a good thing?

Backpage has been sued multiple times for featuring trafficked minors in its listings. In January, the US Senate released a report (pdf)—“Backpage.com’s Knowing Facilitation of Online Sex Trafficking”—that detailed the extent of the problem, based on a two-year investigation. It noted that 73% of trafficking tip-offs to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children from the general public involved Backpage.

Shortly after the report, BackPage shut down its adults-only section. Backpage claims it cooperated with law enforcement and was often used as a tool to uncover human traffickers. Other websites make similar claims. The Erotic Review also pledges a zero-tolerance policy for reviews involving human trafficking or minors, and claims to cooperate with law enforcement when it finds offenders.

What do I think about it?

If you ask 100 sex workers why they work in the business, you’ll get 100 different answers. Some enter the industry by force, some are in it for the money, and others genuinely enjoy the work. Moving this large, diverse industry online has fundamentally changed how sex is bought and sold, generating benefits as well as horrible costs.

Published by Sdwjr

I'm a Journalist,Activist, Publisher, Journalist, Entrepreneur, Orator and Film Maker. Attended the University of Northwestern where I studied Biblical theology and Film. I’ve traveled around the world met some greatest leaders in the world and worked with some of the greatest religious leaders of our times.As a Journalist and an Activist, I’ve dedicated my career highlighting black/brown people struggles through my films,education and creative world.

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